“Eat Shit and Die”

I heard a statement in the news the other day that makes me want to scream!! Generation Y, the young kids today (which includes my baby) are predicted to be the first generation to die before their parents! You know why? Because of all the shit we feed them! Kids under 20 are already starting to have problems with obesity, diabetes, cholesterol, and other illnesses that we aren’t supposed to see until old age (if we see them at all). So here’s what I know… in the 1920’s people were eating fresh, whole foods; foods that were produced by the farmer next door. In the 1940’s all the men went to war, all the women went to work in the factories for the war. New chemicals were developed in these factories… chemicals that include pesticides and preservatives. It was an effort to produce more food and make it last longer. A good thought… unfortunately, they couldn’t have predicted the repercussions! In the past 3 generations, we have seen the invention of processed foods, preservatives, pesticides, herbicides, chemical hormones, food colorings and other additives. Not to mention the invention of the TV that we veg out in front of to eat these processed chemical foods! In the past 3 generations, we have also seen an increase of cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, obesity, reproductive issues, and inflammatory diseases. I wholeheartedly believe that it is directly related to what we are eating. As a society we are over fed but under nourished! No, I cannot sit here and tell you that I cook every meal from my garden, or that I don’t get that box of Mac and Cheese on occasion. But, as of this moment, I am making it my duty to be damn sure that my daughter doesn’t die before I do because of what I fed her! I challenge all the parents out there to do the same! Let’s start eating more whole foods, unprocessed foods, foods that haven’t been chemically altered! Let’s start buying foods locally, that aren’t adulterated with preservatives, or hormones. I know it takes more effort to eat this way. Believe me… I know! I guilt myself every time I pour my daughter that bowl of processed, high sugar cereal. But, what could be more worth the effort of healthy, whole food eating than the life of your children?? If you need a good place to start, I would recommend Sally Fallon’s book “Nourishing Traditions”, or any other whole foods cook book (any other recommendations?)

13 thoughts on ““Eat Shit and Die”

  1. Hi there….that book looks great. I’ve been promising myself that my family is going to eat better. It’s just so hard to put into practice. It’s a commitment I really have to make!

  2. Avoiding processed and “bad” foods is even harder when our society is so saturated with it. I don’t go into Ingles too often, but when I do I always leave wondering what people that shop there eat. Even things that are suppose to be “healthy,” like the fruit juices, are loaded with extra sugar.

    We’re pretty good about eating healthy and now that the garden has taken off its been easier.

    We also use to frequent Amazing Savings…but we kind of got out of that habit because I always felt like we just left with a whole bunch of processed foods. Even though many of the items were “health food junk food.”

    To help myself eat healthy, I don’t take any junk food to work. My snacks are fruit(fresh or dried) and trail mixes. And thats pretty much what we snack on at home now too.

    But I’m sure getting your child to eat healthy is a little tricker! Since kids can often be picky about what they’ll eat.

  3. I’ve been on a quest to eat healthy and unprocessed food for the last six months. This past weekend, we ate home grown zucchinni with couscous and some home made cheese sprinkled on it, and my kids thought it was great! Once they start helping with the cooking, and eating the fruits of their own labor, they get more excited about what they are eating. If they’ve collected the eggs from the coop, their scrambled eggs become more special!!

    I just bought some good whole grain cookbooks: The New Book of Whole Grains : Marlene Anne Bumgarner (Paperback, 1997) and 366 Delicious Ways to Cook Rice, Beans, and Grains : Andrea Chesman (Paperback, 1998). Both have great recipes.

  4. Kids helping in the kitchen and in the garden can definitely make for healthier eaters. Even friends whose kids allegedly hate vegetables have eaten fresh produce out of my garden when they got to find and pick it themselves.

  5. My eight-year-old daughter just came into the house (at 10:04 am) with her best friend, made the statement “We’re thirsty” and headed for the box of caprisuns we keep for special occasions. I asked what the heck she thought she was doing, and she reiterated that they were thirsty. I reminded her that those are for occasional consumption, not for “whenever you decide you’re thirsty & the mood strikes”. That’s what water & milk are for. My daughter is already overweight (and, unfortunately due in decent part to bone structure, will never be considered anywhere near an “ideal weight”), and all I could see is her dumping loads of sugar down her throat at 10 in the morning. Sorry, NOT IN MY HOUSE! They both had a small glass of milk, then went back out to ride bikes. If they come back before I leave for work (my DD spent the night, and will spend today, with her best friend, who’s dad’s got the day off), they’re getting water. I view a capri sun for a child the same way I view a wine-cooler for myself: something to have accompanying dinner, on occasion, not whenever I feel thirsty.

    It’s horrid to know, also, that despite doing our best to keep our daughter on an even keel, diet wise, she interacts with other families who see nothing wrong with allowing their child sugary drinks first thing in the morning; who see nothing wrong with a child having a heaping bowl of sugar-coated cereal (which we don’t even have in the house); who see nothing wrong with chips for a snack, instead of a piece of fruit. NOT in MY house. And evidently I’m going to have to make it crystal clear to my daughter WHY.

    Blessings. –Kati (friend of Steph’s)

  6. That is a heartbreaking prediction. I started Pixie off on an organic, whole foods diet when she started eating. She was just over three when she weaned so she’s only three years on a solidly whole foods diet. Her father eats pure crap whenever he can so it’s an ongoing battle (that I win everytime). Nourishing Traditions is an excellent book as is The Natural Gourmet by Annemarie Colbin.

    This is an excellent topic to bring to the farmers market with me.

  7. I agree with much of what’s been said here, but I have to say this: many *don’t* have a choice about what they eat because they eat what they can afford. And the affordable food is crappy. It’s much cheaper to buy donuts than an apple.

    There’s a lot of research on the links between obesidy and poverty and I think that it’s important to remember this link when we critisize the eating habits of others. Certainly there are people who *choose* to eat poorly but in my opinion that’s because they don’t have the time to search out ‘alternative’ diets.

    I’m putting the bean book on my wish list. Me loves beans and rice. MMmmmm

    (also friend of Steph’s)

  8. Thank you Nio, for the reminder! I guess what makes me the most frustrated is that people don’t have the access to these foods anymore! If you want to fit groceries into your budget processed foods are the most affordable. I wish everyone had an affordable organic farmer living next door!

  9. Having an organic farmer next door would be awesome but in order to do so we have to honor and value farming, which Westerners don’t. How many classes can you take on farming practices? How many schools, for that matter, are dedicated to agriculture?

    The West needs to slow down and accept that it takes time to grow food and, of course, we need to change our economic system from capitalism to something else. Until we accept and make these necessary changes, food will continue to be produced in unhealthy ways.

  10. Having an organic farmer next door would be awesome but in order to do so we have to honor and value farming, which Westerners don’t. How many classes can you take on farming practices? How many schools, for that matter, are dedicated to agriculture?

    The West needs to slow down and accept that it takes time to grow food and, of course, we need to change our economic system from capitalism to something else. Until we accept and make these necessary changes, food will continue to be produced in unhealthy ways.

  11. wow, I saw this on the news too and was looking online to find related articles.

    I am a 19 year old student in college and I agree, people my age and younger often do not eat well and are lazy to do anything active.

    If I ever become a parent, I’m not gonna let my kids die before me either!!! >=/

  12. I coulda written this myself. Instead of screaming, we should start chanting in a low tone “bio-diversity bio-diversity”. If we need any sort of “guide” for how to do this, I’ve discovered a book that states it all in very simple terms, it’s called the Bible. The book of Genisis to be very precise and you don’t have to go past the third chapter. We’ve just purchased 1.9 acres in North Carolina and we are struggling to return the entire parcel to a garden/forest/meadow. The components are all here, all it needs are willing hands and a brain that is sick and tired of being a mindless lemming! Don’t ask me what I think of politicians (R & D alike)!!!!!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>